Announcements, Indoor Plants

3 Great Plants for Small Desks

As offices get more open plan and modern, and more flexible work styles are introduced, large plants and trees can sometimes get in the way. Smaller desks and cleaner working environments are becoming commonplace, but the need for plants is still there.

Small Desk Plants

Here are three great little plants that will grace your desk without taking up much room – giving you your nature boost for the day…

African Violet

This little flower will no doubt brighten up your day! It’s easy to care for and provides a colourful splash in your work space, and there are many colours to choose from to match to your shoes/handbag/mobile phone case etc.

African violets are among the easiest to grow flowering plants. They bloom year-round with little effort. Choose from hundreds of varieties and forms, some with variegated foliage or ruffled or white-edged blooms. African violet likes warm conditions and filtered sunlight. Avoid getting water on the fuzzy leaves; cold water causes unsightly brown spots.

Aloe

Aloe is a succulent, meaning it doesn’t need a lot of water. This plant is sure to strike up a conversation with your workmates, especially when you break the leaves and use the liquid inside to soothe burns and cuts (yes, really!). Oh, and we think it looks pretty good too.

Easy to care for, just make sure the soil is moist and that it gets a reasonable amount of indirect light.

Cactus

Bring out your wild side with this spiny desert lover. A miniature cactus on your desk will really show off your sense of adventure (and provide a useful weapon in which to ward off annoying co-workers). Planted in a rustic vase or a baked bean can, a cactus really does make a statement. 
Cacti are so easy to care for – from the Sahara to Southampton, they just need a small amount of attention.

Instructions for care: Water a small amount once a week, keep away from eyes. Keep in direct sunlight, do not pierce or burn.
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